For Patients
OrthoCarolina Facility

Alicia Lazeski, MD

Fluoroscopically-guided injections are a non-operative, conservative method of treatment for ongoing and chronic back pain or joint pain. These injections are outpatient procedures that can help relieve pain quickly by reducing inflammation in the affected area. Read on to find out why fluoroscopically-guided injections can be an extremely effective non-operative method of treating back or joint pain.


Accuracy delivers medicine more precisely.
Fluoroscopy is a type of imaging that shows a continuous X-ray image as a procedure is performed. The use of fluoroscopy helps improve accuracy by allowing a physician to guide the injection needle to a precise location under direct visualization. This means that the administering physician is able to inject an inflammation-reducing steroid and anesthetic with maximum accuracy.


Who can get fluoroscopically-guided injections?
These steroid injections are used for difficult-to-reach areas of the body such as the spine, shoulder, hip, and sacroiliac joint. They can help treat conditions like hip arthritis, lumbar spine arthritis, lumbar disc herniation, sciatica, piriformis syndrome, sacroiliac joint (SI) issues, shoulder arthritis, and rotator cuff issues. A steroid injection typically includes a corticosteroid (such as dexamethasone, triamcinolone or methylprednisolone) and an anesthetic agent for numbing (such as lidocaine).


Here’s what else you should know.
If your orthopedic provider recommends a fluoroscopically-guided injection, then you’ll be scheduled with an interventional specialist who will place a needle precisely in the affected area and deliver a mixture of medication including a steroid and anesthetic. Pain relief following these injections is typically within one to two weeks and, when coupled with physical therapy and/or oral medications, can be quite effective in reducing a patient’s pain. Although complications from these injections are very rare, it is important to know that complications such as infections and bleeding can occur. Your orthopedic provider can help you determine if a fluoroscopically-guided injection is the best method of treatment for your particular back or joint pain.


Alicia Lazeski, MD, of OrthoCarolina Ballantyne and OrthoCarolina Rock Hill is fellowship-trained in physiatry and interventional spine and is board-certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation.

OrthoCarolina Ballantyne offers a fluoroscopic suite especially for fluoroscopically-guided injections that can accommodate any patient but is particularly convenient to those close to the Ballantyne and Pineville areas.

Comments

June 13, 2019

Donna
- I had an injection yesterday for sciatic pain and lower back pain. Actually, it is feeling less painful already and I’m looking forward to seeing it continue to improve!
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 19, 2019

Good to hear Donna!

June 13, 2019

Sounds like the injections.are total body?? I could use an injection all over. I can barely stand up now because my back and my knees are so painful. My elbows are extremely painful. I can hardly take a phone all. I’m sorry I skipped my appointments. I was and am scared. I’ve been in terrible pain since 2000. That’s when my dad burned up in a barn fire trying to save our horses and I had. My first knee replacement. Please, can you give me some relief? I just talked to Caleb and I feel okay about the Cabel tunnel test and capabilities both the test, the surgery and the post op for sugary. I was scared i’d End up with a hand from leprosy. I play the guitar and I play both the classical, acoustic and electric/ acoustic. I’ve been playing classical guitar since I was 18. The acoustic since I was younger. I play my guitar in hospis, Lion’s club and Shriners club. There’s an Italian restaurant in corrnelis I play weddings, all kinds of redesigns. I started playing st hospice when I was young. Anyway. Please do let’s do. The surgery appointment and possibly the surgery.
- Katrina Nash
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Katrina, we're happy to talk to you more about an option that would be best for your particular needs; please give us a call.

June 13, 2019

Sounds like exactly what I have been looking for. I will call and set up consultation to see if I am eligible for this procedure. I am already in the Ortho Carolina system.
- Rose S. Clay

June 12, 2019

Is this treatment good for knee pain? I had knee surgery a year ago because of a meniscus tear and I'm still having a lot of knee pain.
- Terry
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Hello Terry -- Most knee injections don’t require the use of fluoroscopic guidance. Ongoing knee issues following a surgery are best discussed with your surgeon; if injection therapy is required, they will likely perform those injections in office.

June 11, 2019

I need the injection but I'm allergic to Lidocaine. Is there another numbing medicine that can be used to numb the area?
- Denise
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Denise, unfortunately lidocaine is the only medication used to anesthetize the skin at this time

June 11, 2019

I have arthritis in my left shoulder - doctor says almost bone-on-bone. Is there a possibility this would help my shoulder? I have had steroid injections but they were not effective. SInce Dr, Lazeski is in Rock Hill do you also perform procedure there?
- Donna Troutman
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Donna, fluoroscopically guided injections have been used to provide temporary pain relief in patients with severe shoulder arthritis. These injections are not performed by OrthoCarolina in Rock Hill currently.

June 11, 2019

What is the difference between this and epidural steroid injections?
- M.D. RIDDLE
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Hello -- Epidural steroid injections are a specific type of fluoroscopically guided injection.

June 11, 2019

Right knee bone on bone. I lots of pain that is unbearable. Will this help with my pain
- Debra Carpenter
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Debra, most knee injections don’t require the use of fluoroscopic guidance. A regular injection would be just fine.

June 11, 2019

I had one 2 years ago at OrthoCarolina Laurinburg. Worked well!
- Anne
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

June 11, 2019

Thank you Ann.

June 11, 2019

Very interested since I’m already a patient. Can u be partially sedated for this procedure?
- Gail
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Gail, in some cases, patients can have certain injections performed at a surgery center where we can offer partial sedation with oral or IV medications

June 11, 2019

I live in Albemarle, NC. Is there somewhere closer to me to get this done?
- Stacey
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Stacey, OrthoCarolina has several facilities where physicians perform fluoroscopically guided injections. Locations include Matthews, Monroe, Ballantyne, Randolph Road, Concord, Huntersville and Gastonia

June 11, 2019

I would like more information on this. I just had a steroid injection in my shoulder that did not work at all. Would like to know more about this procedure to insure that it works!
- Joann Shaw
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Joann, we would recommend you schedule an office visit with a shoulder specialist to discuss if a fluoroscopically guided injection may be indicated for your particular needs.

June 11, 2019

Will this be effective for a partially town ACL dr does not want to operate .am 79 yrs old and inflamed knee since 2017 , Dr Surprock is my dr.
- Frances Bost
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Frances, most knee injections don’t require the use of fluoroscopic guidance. A regular injection should be just fine.

June 11, 2019

I plan to talk with Dr. Chapman about me receiving this help. For years I have had joint arthritis with low back pain and all my other joints. Thank you all for having this treatment .
- Theo (Theophinia) Robinson
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

June 11, 2019

Thanks Theo!

June 11, 2019

I am very interested In having this procedule. For years I have pain in these areas. I plan to talk with Dr. Chapman about me and how it could help me.
- Theo Robinson (Theophinia)
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Theo, thanks. Hope we can find something that works for you.

June 11, 2019

Your can check with dr. Rhyne is see if it would be help me.
- Corinna sells
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Corinna, you can call Dr. Rhyne's office directly to set up an appointment.

June 11, 2019

do you have anything convenient to the lake norman area??
- randy howell
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Randy, OrthoCarolina has several facilities where physicians perform fluoroscopically guided injections. Locations include Matthews, Monroe, Ballantyne, Randolph Road, Concord, Huntersville and Gastonia

June 11, 2019

How long do the shots last
- Lorraine tongue
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Hi, every patient is different. Positive effects from injections may last days, weeks, months or years.

June 11, 2019

Is there anywhere closer to Charlotte that can administer this kind of procedure .
- Peggy Clay
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

Peggy, OrthoCarolina has several facilities where physicians perform fluoroscopically guided injections. Locations include Matthews, Monroe, Ballantyne, Randolph Road, Concord, Huntersville and Gastonia

June 11, 2019

Does Medicare pay for them oh, and how much are they a if I paid cash
- John Warden
Reply From: OrthoCarolina

July 12, 2019

John, Most insurances cover these injections; what percentage of the injection cost is covered is dependent on a patient’s individual insurance plan. You can call and ask for our business office for specific plan and cost questions.

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