What's in a serving? How to know you're eating enough fruits and veggies

By OrthoCarolina Wellness Center Nutritionists

3 Vegetables and 2 Fruits a Day

Eating 5 servings of vegetables and fruits is associated with a lower risk of cancer, stroke and heart disease. Produce are nutrition powerhouses, stocked full of the essential vitamins and minerals we need as well as plenty of fiber to maintain a healthy gut and reduce the risk of colon cancer.
Many vegetables and fruits are high in folate, vitamin C and potassium. Most are low in calories, helping support a healthy weight.

Visiting the farmer's market is a great way to find fresh fruits and vegetables and challenge yourself to try new foods.

What is 1 Serving?

  • Raw leafy greens: 1 cup
  • Fresh, frozen or canned fruits or vegetables: 1/2 cup
  • Whole fruit: 1 medium fruit, about the size of your fist
  • Vegetable juice: 1/2 cup
  • Fruit juice: 1/4 cup
  • Dried fruit: 1/4 cup

5 Ways to Get Your 5 a Day

1. Start with the first meal of the day
2. Boost your snacks with fruits and vegetables
3. Double up on vegetable servings
4. Use produce as ingredients in other dishes (think baked goods, chili, meatloaf)

5. Try a new fruit or vegetable each week, especially this summer when everything is in peak season.

While frozen is just as nutritious as fresh, there will be an abundance of locally grown produce available in the summer. These foods are often cheaper to buy fresh when they are in season. Eat up!


The OrthoCarolina Wellness Center in Matthews is a facility like no other- integrating physical therapy, post- PT rehab, work conditioning, group fitness classes, personal training, youth sports performance, and yoga, and wellness services such as massage, a Registered Dietitian, weight management programs, and corporate wellness, all under one roof.





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